A Report on Non-Ionizing Radiation

China: Microwave News Article Archive (2004 - )

August 14, 2012

“Increasing Incidence of Brain and Nervous Tumours in Urban Shanghai, China, 1983-2007,”

Asian-Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 2011 (open access).

May 15, 2009

There are many reasons not to use a cell phone in an elevator. The most obvious would be as a courtesy to other passengers. Another is that a phone has to work harder in a shielded space. It's forced to operate at higher power levels for the signal to get out and reach the nearest tower and that leads to more ambient radiation in the elevator.

What most cell phone users would never consider is that a fellow passenger absorbs some of the radiation that would otherwise bounce back off the walls. It turns out, according to some new calculations from Japan, that a lone user can get a maximum exposure of about 1.6 W/Kg, 80% of the ICNIRP standard (2 W/Kg). But be advised that exposures could exceed the current U.S. FCC standard by a wide margin, under worst-case conditions. (This is a rare —no, unique— example of an American EMF standard being stricter than those in other countries.) The FCC limit is averaged over only 1g of tissue and, as Jim Lin, a member of ICNIRP, has often pointed out, increasing the averaging volume from 1 g to 10 g could triple the allowable radiation exposure (see MWN, N/D00, p.3). These new findings appear in the May issue of the IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques.

December 15, 2008

This could be a breakthrough, a major breakthrough. It could explain how power lines promote childhood leukemia. It could identify which children are at greatest risk. And it could shed new light on the pivotal role played by EMF-induced DNA breaks.

Chinese researchers have found that children who carry a defective version of a gene that would otherwise help repair damaged DNA are much more likely to develop leukemia if they also live near power lines or transformers. Xiaoming Shen and coworkers at the Jiao Tong University School of Medicine in Shanghai have reported that children with this genetic variant —known as a polymorphism or snp (pronounced "snip") —and who lived within 100 meters of these sources of EMFs had over four times more leukemia than neighboring children with a fully functional version of the same gene.

December 7, 2006

Dariusz Leszczynski, of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority ( STUK) in Helsinki, has been appointed Guangbiao Professor at China's Zhejiang University Medical School. Over the next three years, Leszczynski will spend one month each year at the university's Bioelectromagnetics Lab, where he will collaborate with Zhengping Xu. Together, they will focus on the effects of cell phone radiation on human proteins. At the same time, Leszczynski will continue to serve as the head of STUK's radiation biology lab, where he has been a leader in applying proteomic and transcriptomic techniques to the study of RF biological effects.

December 1, 2006

Four radio and TV broadcast towers will be moved out of downtown Beijing, the Shangai Daily reported yesterday. The radiation from the towers presents an unacceptable risk, according to Du Shaozhong, the deputy director of the Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau. Beijing is infamous for its foul air —it has been called the air pollution capital of the world— so it's remarkable that RF/MW radiation is considered an environmental priority. In the next five years, Beijing will impose strict rules on the location of new facilities that emit electromagnetic radiation, Du said.

September 29, 2005

Research scientists in China have found that relatively low-level RF radiation can lead to DNA breaks, according to a briefing paper prepared for the cell phone industry obtained by Microwave News.

At the 4th International Seminar on EMFs and Biological Effects, held in Kunming China, September 12-16, Zhengping Xu of the Zhejiang University School of Medicine reported that cells exposed to a pulsed 1800 MHz RF radiation at an SAR of 3 W/Kg for 24 hours showed a statistically significant increase in DNA damage. The Mobile Manufacturers Forum (MMF), an industry lobbying group based in Brussels, circulated the news in a September 22 Research Briefing.

January 7, 2005

The 4th International Seminar on EMFs and Biological Effects will be held in Kunming, China, September 12-16. The official language of the meeting is English. The third seminar was held in Guilin in October 2003.

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